This blog entry is the hardest one I’ve written to date

Will insurance cover any complications that arise during elective surgery?

Remember the question my husband keeps asking the doctors … and how the answer we keep hearing is basically … NO?  For this reason, all breast doctors want you to get a mammogram before surgery.  Some doctors (Doctor 1 in our case) even want you to get a full physical workup. By doing so and ruling out any potential health issues beforehand, your risk of problems during surgery drop to almost nothing.

Seemed like a pretty good idea to me. Plus I haven’t had a good workup in years.  “Years” meaning never.  So, I decided to bite the bullet and submit to a complete medical examination and all the joys that go along with it.  It’s always good to know where your health stands anyway, right? I called my regular doctor … which resulted in a general exam (weight, blood pressure, etc.), blood tests and a surprise PAP (and it wasn’t even my birthday) yesterday as well as chest x-rays and an EKG today.

Some, not all, of the results are in.  The blood work is fine.  Always good to hear. Unfortunately, the chest x-ray (the first I’ve ever received) is not.

I have a tumor. On my right lung.  On the pleura (lining) of my right lung.  Which, apparently, if you’re going to have a tumor on your lung is the best place to have it.  About the size of a ping pong ball.  Or a jawbreaker.  Believe it or not, this was debated for a few minutes.

They don’t know what it is. So, I’m going in for a cat scan tomorrow. My husband and my parents know. And two of my good friends.  And now you.

For the record, yes, I am concerned.  More so than with the breast lump we discovered six weeks ago.  And pissed off with myself for being concerned.  I have a good friend in the hospital who is actually having surgery tomorrow to have a mass removed.  If you send out any good vibes tonight, send them to her.  She needs them.  I need a good night’s sleep. And maybe a valium. I’ll be fine.

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12 responses to “This blog entry is the hardest one I’ve written to date

  1. While surgery may be elective, preventative health screenings are not. You fight your insurance about that shit and let the sphere know if you need some back up. I got some bitches.

    On another note… all my positive energy and peaceful thoughts to your friend. May she be well.

  2. As I said on Facebook, all will be well. You could have had this for years. There’s no way to know since this was your first chest xray. Let’s keep our thoughts positive.

  3. My thoughts and prayers are with you and our friend in surgery. Hopefully having all of our friends pulling for you both (I’ve seen Facebook. You’ll have 1000 prayers today) will carry both of you through without any problems. You are young and healthy. There are many things this could be other than that dreaded diagnosis. Good luck!

  4. Prayers headed that way for YOU and your friend!!!

  5. Shit. I’m thinking about you.

    And text me if you really want Valium. I know people.

  6. Positive thoughts and vibes headed your way… also to your friend today. I can only imagine the thoughts and feelings running through your head right now… So glad that these doctors are thorough and that you wanted new boobs (a blessing in disguise, obviously)!

  7. You are in my thoughts and prayers. Ernie says there are lots of benign things this can be. Call me soon!

  8. I hope this turns out to be a funny story after they check it out.
    Hopes and prayers for your friend and you.

  9. Well, that sounds kind of scary. Do you recall ever inhaling a jawbreaker and getting it stuck in your pleura? Or a ping pong ball? Sorry, that’s absurd. Why would anyone inhale a ping pong ball?

    I hope everything turns out fine for you and your friend, and I have a feeling it will.

  10. Love you – you are in my thoughts and prayers.

  11. Pingback: Happy Birthday, ODNT! | Guapola

  12. Pingback: There are some things in life I don’t understand. This is one of them. | OldDogNewTits

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